HIV and AIDS in Africa


Sub-Saharan Africa is more heavily affected by HIV and AIDS than any other region of the world. An estimated 22.4 million people are living with HIV in the region - around two thirds of the global total. In 2008 around 1.4 million people died...more

HIV types, groups and subtypes

What is the difference between HIV-1 and HIV-2




There are two types of HIV: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Both types are transmitted by sexual contact, through blood, and from mother to child, and they appear to cause clinically indistinguishable AIDS. However, it seems that...more

HIV Diagnosis

Exams and Tests



Getting tested for HIV can be scary; however, the condition is treatable so it is important to get tested if you think you have been exposed. If you test positive, early detection and monitoring of HIV will help your doctor determine whether the disease is progressing...more

AIDS Care


One of the best places for people with AIDS to be cared for is at home, surrounded by the people who love them. Many people living with AIDS can lead an active life for long periods of time. Most of the time, people with AIDS do not need to be in a hospital. Being at home is often cheaper, more...more

HIV: focus on children

A family-centred approach to preventing infection is more effective, writes Linda Richter The Big read: Nowhere to be seen" is how one could describe the attention given to children only a few years ago - two decades into the HIV/Aids epidemic. Tear-stained faces and sick parents illustrated how fundraising...more

HIV and AIDS in Africa

Mon, Sep 20, 2010


Sub-Saharan Africa is more heavily affected by HIV and AIDS than any other region of the world. An estimated 22.4 million people are living with HIV in the region - around two thirds of the global total. In 2008 around 1.4 million people died from AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa and 1.9 million people became infected with HIV. Since the beginning of the epidemic more than 14 million children have lost one or both parents to AIDS.1
In the absence of massively expanded prevention, treatment and care efforts,...more


HIV types, groups and subtypes

Mon, Sep 20, 2010

What is the difference between HIV-1 and HIV-2




There are two types of HIV: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Both types are transmitted by sexual contact, through blood, and from mother to child, and they appear to cause clinically indistinguishable AIDS. However, it seems that HIV-2 is less easily transmitted, and the period between initial infection and illness is longer in the case of HIV-2.
Worldwide, the predominant virus is HIV-1, and generally when people refer to HIV without specifying the type of virus they will be referring to HIV-1....more


HIV Diagnosis

Mon, Sep 20, 2010

Exams and Tests



Getting tested for HIV can be scary; however, the condition is treatable so it is important to get tested if you think you have been exposed. If you test positive, early detection and monitoring of HIV will help your doctor determine whether the disease is progressing and when to start treatment.
Your doctor may recommend counseling before and after HIV testing, and it is usually available at the hospital or clinic where you will be tested. This will give you an opportunity to:


AIDS Care

Mon, Sep 20, 2010


One of the best places for people with AIDS to be cared for is at home, surrounded by the people who love them. Many people living with AIDS can lead an active life for long periods of time. Most of the time, people with AIDS do not need to be in a hospital. Being at home is often cheaper, more comfortable, more familiar, and gives them more control of their life. In fact, people with AIDS-related illnesses often get better faster and with less discomfort at home with the help of their friends and loved ones.
If you are caring for someone with AIDS at home, remember...more


HIV: focus on children

Mon, Sep 20, 2010

A family-centred approach to preventing infection is more effective, writes Linda Richter The Big read: Nowhere to be seen" is how one could describe the attention given to children only a few years ago - two decades into the HIV/Aids epidemic. Tear-stained faces and sick parents illustrated how fundraising efforts seldom benefited children affected by the disease.

Many important HIV/Aids gatherings used children "decoratively", having them dance and wave flags at opening and closing ceremonies, but did little to address the enormous HIV/Aids-related challenges...more